It’s bean a busy week

There has been a lot of construction work in the Kitchen Garden this week.  Come and take a look at our beautiful new bean poles made using hazel coppiced from the Chartwell woods and find out how we did it at Chartwell Veg Patch

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Don’t forget that from this weekend you can combine a visit to the house and gardens as the house opens to the public again on 28th February.

Becky Reader

 

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February flower count

If you are new to Chartwell gardens blog then welcome! If you have been a follower of the blog before then you will have noticed that it has gone very quiet over the last 6 months or more. This is because there have been a lot of changes in the gardens over that period and one of those changes has been that our resident blogger, Jamie, having completed a secondment at Nymans, has now moved on to a new position with the National Trust at Polesden Lacey.

In the meantime all of our other gardeners have had their hands full keeping the gardens looking beautiful and therefore there has been no time for blogging…until now. I joined the garden team at the end of December working as an intern in the Kitchen Garden under the supervision of Claire Bryant.  The new blog which I started following my 6 month internship can be found at Chartwell Veg Patch

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The kitchen garden

This week I have been let out of the kitchen garden to see what else is going on in the rest of the gardens at Chartwell. In the main garden I got the chance to be involved in the February flower count which traditionally takes place every year on Valentine’s Day.

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Matt Law who is the gardener with particular responsibility for the formal gardens (rather than the wider estate) and who knows more about the plants at Chartwell than anyone else took me on a tour to spot and record which of our plants are currently in flower.

These included familiar favourites for this time of year such as crocuses, camellia, hellebores, irises, hamamelis (witch hazel) and primroses which I was able to identify without too much help from Matt…

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Snowdrops in the Winter Border which is in the Orchard just outside the Kitchen Garden

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Winter aconites edge the winter border

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Periwinkle (vinca major) can be found near the Water Feature

At the very top of the Winter Border, near the Pet Graves, you be able to smell the sweet scent of these Daphne bholua 'Jacqueline Postill' shrubs before you actually see them...

Daphne bholua ‘Jacqueline Postill’ is currently in full bloom and smelling divine at the top of the Winter Border

… but also a few that are new to me such as pulmonaria (common lungswort) and the spring snowflakes (leucojum vernum). These are closely related to the snowdrop but on taller stems that at first glance make it look more like a daffodil.

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Spring snowflake (leucojum vernum) can be found in front of the Swimming Pool

We also cleared and then planted up the border that leads from the Visitor Centre down towards the house with new plants. The old border had become a bit dark and enclosed and the new border will allow visitors to really appreciate the best of the views.

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Matt and Chris laying out the new plants

Once they were all in place...

Once they were all in place…

... we were allowed to get digging

… we were allowed to get digging

Sarcococca ruscifolia (sweet box) has a beautiful scent

Sarcococca ruscifolia (sweet box) has a beautiful scent

The new plants include helleborus niger (a white flowering hellebore), helleborus argutifolius (with lime green flowers), lots of beautiful smelling sarcococca ruscifolia (sweet box), ruscus aculeatus (butcher’s broom), some ferns including polypodium vulgare and a good sprinkling of snowdrops. We also left some gaps at the back of the border for some ilex (holly) to go in when our delivery arrives.

It took us most of the day to get all of the planting done and then we watered everything in before mulching with a good layer of manure.

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Claire starts mulching – the new delivery of manure was so fresh it was warm and steaming!

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Thursday volunteers Lynne and Karen water the plants in

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The finished border

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A good days work!

The border is already looking good but will of course get better and better as the year goes on.  Hopefully if you have time over half term week you can come and take at look at our work and see if you can spot all of the plants that are currently in bloom.

Becky Reader

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Food With A View

The new Restaurant Border at Chartwell

The new Restaurant Border at Chartwell

Anyone who has arrived at Chartwell in the last month and walked past the brand spanking new and improved restaurant will also hopefully have noticed that the border in front of it has been completely redesigned and replanted too. I was tasked with overseeing this project and with the help of the rest of the gardening staff and volunteers I’m pleased to say that it is now available for your viewing pleasure! There were quite a few restrictions placed on the design including a relatively small budget (of course!), a very narrow border depth and a poor, sloping soil. The border was also required to look as established as possible right from the off in order to screen some of the new restaurant decking. The plants were to be evergreen where possible, drought tolerant and also low maintenance. All of these stipulations actually proved to be a really interesting challenge and actually helped narrow down the plant choice nicely.

Many visitors have been asking about this yellow-leaved plant in the border.  It is the brilliantly named Escallonia 'Gold Brian'!

Many visitors have been asking about this yellow-leaved plant in the border. It is the brilliantly named Escallonia ‘Gold Brian’!

Once the old border had been weeded and dug over, we added some chicken manure pellets to boost the fertility and some of our own Chartwell-made compost to try and improve the soil structure. The planting itself could then begin using the new plants that had been safely stored in our plant quarantine area for the prior 6 weeks since being delivered by our suppliers. This ensured that we could make sure we were not bringing in any new pests or diseases into the garden here. In actual fact it meant that we were able to spot some highly invasive Mare’s Tail (Equisetum arvense) that had sprung up in one of the Bay Tree pots during this time! Phew!

These Lavandula angustifolia ‘Lodden Pink’ plants are really starting to show off their blooms now

These Lavandula angustifolia ‘Lodden Pink’ plants are really starting to show off their blooms now

I had decided to split the 32m border into seven individual sections of approximately 4.5m. The planting would then repeat across these sections but alternate between a pink and white colour scheme in sections 1, 3, 5 and 7 and a blue, purple and yellow scheme in sections 2, 4 and 6. For instance, in the odd-numbered sections you will find the pink-flowered Rosmarinus officinalis ‘Roseus’ while in the even-numbered areas there are blue-flowered Rosemary plants called Rosmarinus officinalis var. angustissimus ‘Beneden Blue’. Some plants such as the lollipop Bay trees (Laurus nobilis) anchor the whole border by appearing in every section. My initial plan for this design can be seen in the picture below. It shows early version that had to be sent to the architects and council planners for approval because the border was tied in with the whole restaurant re-build. Some of the plants changed between making this plan and the final planting process but hopefully it will give you an idea of the effect we were trying to achieve.

My initial plan for the new border

My initial plan for the new border

The new restaurant here at Chartwell is called the Landemare Cafe. The relevance of this name refers to the fact that Mrs Landemare was a cook for the Churchill family, initially at weekend parties here at Chartwell but eventually in a full time capacity here and at 10 Downing Street between 1939 and 1954. Lady Churchill apparently knew she would be able to make the best out of rations and that everyone in the household would be happy and contented. She said that “Mrs. Landemare’s food was delicious. She is an inspired and intuitive cook.”

Ann and Georgie get stuck in with the planting of the new border...

Ann and Georgie get stuck in with the planting of the new border…

...while Steve makes sure all of the plants are well watered in.

…while Steve makes sure all of the plants are well watered in.

A full list of the plants we used in this new border are as follows:

7 x Laurus nobilis standard tree
7 x Cistus cyprius10 x Cistus purpureus
13 x Phlomis fruticosa13 x Rosmarinus officinalis var. angustissimus ‘Beneden Blue’
18 x Rosmarinus officinalis ‘Roseus’
13 x Santolina chamaecyparissus16 x Santolina pinnata subsp. neopolitana ‘Edward Bowles’
13 x Sedum spectabile ‘Iceberg’
21 x Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’
21 x Artemisia ‘Powis Castle’
13 x Lavandula x intermedia ‘Vera’
18 x Lavandula angustifolia ‘Lodden Pink’
8 x Lonicera japonica ‘Darts World’
6 x Lonicera japonica ‘Hallania’
12 x Hebe ‘Great Orme’
9 x Escallonia laevis ‘Gold Brian’

I chose Lavandula x intermedia ‘Vera’ not only because it is a beautiful plant in its own right and because it it thought to be the original species lavender, but also in memory of my late Grandmother Vera Harris who sadly passed away fairly recently. Once the planting was complete we took a group of volunteers up there and mulched the whole area with woodchips derived from some of the fallen trees and branches we suffered earlier in the year.

The honeysuckles are flowering well in the border right now...

The honeysuckles are flowering well in the border right now…

As are the Santolinas.  These are also known as Cotton Lavender plants even though they are neither cotton nor lavender!

…As are the Santolinas. These are also known as Cotton Lavender plants even though they are neither cotton nor lavender!

Make sure you come and have a walk along this new border the next time you’re here with us at Chartwell. It may not be part of the garden itself but it is still in-keeping with the rest of the garden, using plants, colours and styles that you will find elsewhere throughout the Churchills’ grounds. The fact that some of the plants in this border are also edible, such as the Bay and Rosemary, ties them in nicely to the new Landemare Cafe too.

The Landemare Cafe and new border at Chartwell

The Landemare Cafe and new border at Chartwell

Incidentally, this project was the last one I’ll carry out here at Chartwell for a while and this here blog post is also the last one I will be writing for a time too. I will be starting a 5 month secondment as Assistant Head Gardener at nearby Nymans soon but we hope that the rest of the gardening team here at Chartwell will be able to keep this blog going in my absence! I have written 134 posts in this blog over the last couple of years and it has received over 35,000 ‘hits’ during that time, so long may it continue. I plan to do a bit of moonlight blogging while I’m at Nymans however via my companion Horticulture Week blog which you can find by clicking here, so please feel free to join me there too!

All the best…
Jamie

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Do You Dig Our Digitalis?

Take a good close look inside a Foxglove flower to glimpse its true beauty

Take a good close look inside a Foxglove flower to glimpse its true beauty

With the weather really hotting up right now, it feels like Summer is certainly doing its best to take a hold here at Chartwell. This means that most of the Spring flowers and blooms like Tulips, Daffs, Bluebells and the like have done their turn and given way to the huge array of Summer colour that will soon be completely filling Churchill’s gardens. There are a few plants however that straddle the seasons and one of the best at doing that at the moment is the humble Foxglove, or Digitalis purpurea.

White Foxgloves reach for the sky from the aptly named Foxglove Bed!

White Foxgloves reach for the sky from the aptly named Foxglove Bed!

Foxgloves are classed as a short-lived perennial or more commonly as a biennial. We sow ours indoors in the Summer, grow them on, prick them out and pot them on before planting them out in the Autumn where they happily overwinter before blooming the following Spring. The resulting plant can self seed freely if allowed to but when the resulting flowers are as pretty as they are, who cares?! As you can see from the picture above, we actually have a small area of the garden behind the Golden Orfe Pond actually called the Foxglove Bed that is filled with gorgeous spires of white Foxgloves every year. They really sing out from this dark, shady spot but they are certainly not the only examples within the Chartwell boundaries as you will see throughout this blog post.

The Bomb Crater in the Chartwell woods looks even better studded with Foxgloves

The Bomb Crater in the Chartwell woods looks even better studded with Foxgloves

Digitalis purpurea was named by the Swedish botanist Carl Linnaeus in 1753 in his important publication ‘Species Plantarum’. The Genus name Digitalis comes from the Latin for finger (digitus), referring to the shape of the flowers. The species name purpurea simply refers to the colour of the flowers of the wild form, which are frequently purple (although a white-flowered form is also fairly common). OK, so Digitalis purpurea is the latin or botanical name and Foxglove is the common name but were you aware of the sheer number of other common names by which this plant can be known as?

Bloody bells
Bloody finger
Cow flop
Dead man’s bells
Dog’s lugs
Dragon’s mouth
Fairy bells
Fairy fingers
Fairy gloves
Fairy thimbles
Fairy’s cap
Fairy’s petticoat
Fairy’s thimble
Finger flower
Flap dock
Folk’s gloves
Fox finger
Gloves of Mary
Lady’s fingers
Lady’s gloves
Lady’s thimble
Lion’s mouth
Lusmore
Lustmore
Pop dock
Thimble finger
Thimble flower
Throat root
Witches’ bells
Witches’ fingers
Witches’ gloves
Witches’ thimbles

Blimey! I’m not sure what the World record is for number of common names but that’s got to be up there, surely?

In the Cut Flower area of the Walled Garden you will find this 'Apricot' variety...

In the Cut Flower area of the Walled Garden you will find this ‘Apricot’ variety…

...and this glorious 'Pam's Choice'

…and this glorious ‘Pam’s Choice’

Foxgloves are a source of digitoxin, a chemical used in the drug ‘Digitalis’, which has been used as a heart stimulant since as early as 1785. Although normally made using Digitalis lanata leaves, D. purpurea use is not unknown. They are also well-known for their toxicity, and ingestion of the leaves can result in severe poisoning. Despite this toxicity, they have been widely used in folk-medicine throughout the ages. Foxglove Tea (an infusion of the leaves) was taken for colds, fevers and catarrh, and compresses were used for ulcers, swellings and bruises. The Foxglove’s most common use however was as a diuretic against dropsy (an accumulation of fluid in the tissues), for which it was sometimes effective, but occasionally proved fatal! William Withering, an 18th century botanist and physician, discovered that an infusion of the leaves of Foxgloves could slow and strengthen the heartbeat, which in turn stimulated the kidneys to clear the body and lungs of excess fluid. He also showed that Foxglove leaves could be used in the treatment of heart failure, but that high doses could also stop the heart!

More white Foxgloves loom majestically at the back of the Herbaceous Border

More white Foxgloves loom majestically at the back of the Herbaceous Border

Van Gogh is said to have taken Foxglove tincture as a treatment for his epilepsy and art historians believe that the yellow haze that this could cause in the sight of patients for this type of treatment may be responsible for the appearance of many of his yellow dominated paintings. Back in 1554, Nicholas Culpeper (an English botanist, herbalist, physician, and astrologer) said that “foxglove was one of the best remedies for a scabby head”! So now you know! In Roman mythology, Flora, the Goddess of fields, crops and flowers, placed a foxglove blossom on Juno’s stomach causing her to instantly conceive. She went from Flora’s garden to the shoreline and gave birth to Mars. In Scandinavia, they say that foxes were saved by the fairies from extinction when the fairies gave them the secret of how to ring the Foxglove bells to warn other foxes of approaching hunters. The foxes were also said to put on these flower gloves so that they would tread more softly among the chicken roosts to capture an unsuspecting hen or rooster. In Wales, Foxgloves were called Goblin’s Gloves and was said to attract the hobgoblins who wore the long bells on their fingers as gloves that imparted magical properties.

Paths in the Chartwell estate are lined with purple Foxgloves

Paths in the Chartwell estate are lined with purple Foxgloves

So whether you believe any of that Foxglove folklore or not, be sure to hurry along to Chartwell soon to catch this year’s crop before they disappear again until next Spring…

Jamie

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Ellie & Agnes Who?

Elaeagnus 'Quicksilver' along the entrance path at Chartwell

Elaeagnus ‘Quicksilver’ along the entrance path at Chartwell

Although here in the gardens of the Churchill family we are rightly proud of all of the plants in our collection, at various times of the year, us gardeners will be asked by our visitors for the identity of a core group of recurring plants. During the Summer it might be the Phytolacca americana in the Herbaceous Border with its corn on the cob-like purple fruits. During mid Spring it might be the masses of white flowers of our Exochorda macrantha bushes on the Kitchen Garden banks that catch the eye. And in the depths of Winter the alien seed heads of our recently introduced Cardiocrinum giganteum might be stealing the show. Right now however, the delightful vanillary scent of the yellow flowers of our Elaeagnus ‘Quicksilver’ plants are grabbing a great deal of the horticultural headlines.

It really is a shame that scratch and sniff computer screens haven't been invented yet!

It really is a shame that scratch and sniff computer screens haven’t been invented yet!

Also known as the Silver Bush or Wolf Willow, this Elaeagnus originated in England as a chance hybrid seedling, recognized and named by celebrated British plantsman Roy Lancaster. Roy actually suggests that he thinks it may be a hybrid between Elaeagnus angustifolius and Elaeagnus commutata.

Popular with bees as well as human Chartwell visitors!

Popular with bees as well as human Chartwell visitors!

E. ‘Quicksilver’ displays striking silvery foliage on this deciduous, fast-growing shrub. It likes a fertile, well drained soil in full sun, and works well as a specimen plant, or in a shrub border. It can tolerate open or sheltered sites and grows just as well in clay, sandy or loamy soils of virtually any pH. It is considered drought resistant and also thrives in salty coastal conditions, requiring little or no maintenance, although it can reach up to 8ft in height and spread if left completely to its own devices.

We have another group of 'Quicksilver' bushes near the Croquet Lawn overlooking our Orchard

We have another group of ‘Quicksilver’ bushes near the Croquet Lawn overlooking our Orchard

‘Quicksilver’ has none of the hazardous spines of E. angustifolia and it is sterile which means that won’t seed itself about like other Elaeagnus shrubs. Although it can sucker itself, it doesn’t do this too vigorously and so doesn’t run around where it isn’t wanted. If I may keep singing its praises, it is also deer-proof, fixes atmospheric nitrogen and can also be pruned back hard to form an attractive silver dome!

The silver leaves are matched only by the golden hues of the young stems

The stunning silver leaves are matched only by the golden hues of the young stems

Anyway, don’t take my word for all this, come and have a look and a smell for yourselves and enjoy one of the unsung heroes of the gardens of this country…

Jamie

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All Hail The President!

What better way to take a breather at Chartwell than in Lady Churchill's Rose Garden beneath a gorgeous Clematis?!

What better way to take a breather at Chartwell than in Lady Churchill’s Rose Garden beneath a gorgeous Clematis?!

If you asked a cross section of garden lovers and enthusiasts to name their favourite plant, I’m betting that quite a few of them may well plump for the good ol’ Clematis. But with so many varieties and types to choose from, which particular one would be the most popular? Well, here in the gardens of the Churchill family home we have over 20 different choices of Clematis, but there is one in particular that is blooming like crazy right now, so perhaps Clematis ‘The President’ might be top of the pops for some of you! Found against one of the surrounding stone walls in Lady Churchill’s Rose Garden, it also provides a perfect back-drop to any pictures taken of friends or family sat on the rustic stone bench beneath.

When glimpsed through the group of standard Wisteria trees you can see how the flowers compliment each other perfectly

When glimpsed through the group of standard Wisteria trees you can see how the flowers compliment each other perfectly

‘The President’ was introduced by Charles Noble in 1876, a nurseryman credited with introducing many Clematis cultivars mainly by crossing C. ‘Standishii’ with C. ‘Fortunei’ and various forms of C. patens. Born in 1817, Noble followed in his father’s horticultural footsteps and set up a nursery with John Standish in Bagshot, Surrey. Noble also forged links with celebrated plant hunter Robert Fortune, selling some of the plants he brought back from his trips to China for the first time in the UK. Little is known of him after he retired in 1989 but ‘The President’ still holds its own among many modern varieties and is the holder of the Royal Horticultural Society’s prestigious Award of Garden Merit (AGM) since 1993. So popular is ‘The President’ that it is often used by breeders as a base for creating newer varieties today.

The flowers start off as this striking vibrant blue/purple colour...

The overlapping sepals of the large flowers start off as this striking vibrant blue/purple colour…

...before maturing to this paler and perhaps more interesting mottled mix

…before maturing to this paler and perhaps more interesting mottled mix

This Clematis can tolerate full sun or partial shade, is fully hardy and likes a well-drained soil, preferably alkaline but either heavy or light in structure. It can grow to 3m in height with a spread of around 1m. This relatively compact habit makes it ideal for smaller gardens or borders or even in a container. One of the big plus points of ‘The President’ is that the impressively=sized blooms can last from late Spring right up to early Autumn in ideal conditions.

Look, there are still plenty more blooms to come on our specimen!

Look, there are still plenty more blooms to come on our specimen!

Not as many people as you might think actually grow Clematis in their own gardens, partly due to the fact that there is an air of mystery surrounding their pruning. It is true that Clematis fall into three pruning groups but the process is relatively simple as long as you know your particular variety:

Pruning Group 1 consists of early-blooming clematis that flower on shoots produced the previous season. They require little regular pruning except for the deadheading of faded flowers. In later years some training and perhaps thinning might be necessary. If renovation is required, plants can be cut back to 15cm from the base after flowering, although this will affect flowering and should not be carried out again within three years. Prune mid to late spring, after flowering and once the risk of frost has passed.

Pruning Group 2 (which includes our C. ‘The President) comprises the large-flowered cultivars that flower from May to June or beyond on short shoots developing from the previous year’s growth. Some (such as our subject in this blog) flower again in late Summer on new growth. Prune dead or weak stems in February and remove flower heads, back to a large growth bud immediately below the flower, as soon as the first flush of flowers is over in early Summer. They can also, if preferred, be left un-pruned except for the removal of dead shoots in Spring.

Pruning Group 3. This group comprises clematis that flower from mid to late Summer on the ends of the current year’s growth. If this type is left un-pruned growth will continue from where it ended the previous season, resulting in a tangled mass of growth, flowering well above eye level with stems bare at the base. These late-flowering clematis are best pruned back hard in February each year to the lowest pair of buds.

Even the flower heads that have lost their petals have a stark charming beauty to them

Even the dark red anthers on the flower heads that have lost their petals have a stark charming beauty to them

So whether you have a Clematis of your own; you think you might chose a Clematis as your fave plant; or whether you just want to see the the loveliness of ours in close up with your own eyes, get yourselves down to Chartwell again soon and swear horticultural allegiance to ‘The President’!

Jamie

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An Azara Amongst The Azaleas

The oft-overlooked Azalea Banks at Chartwell

The oft-overlooked Azalea Banks at Chartwell

Everyone who comes and pays us a visit here at Chartwell will have their favourite part of the gardens, probably depending on what time of year they dropped in. For some it might be a walk in the woods or a mooch around the Kitchen Garden while for others the blooms within Lady Churchill’s Rose Garden or the views from the Top Terrace might be highlighted. But not many people will perhaps put forward the Azalea Banks which at this moment especially is a great shame. As you leave the driveway in front of the house via the far roadside corner and head down towards the Croquet Lawn, most peoples’ eyes will be drawn by the Croquet Lawn itself and the sweeping views of the Kent Weald beyond. But turn your head 90 degrees and you will see the part of the garden I’m talking about. The grassy banks don’t lead anywhere, apart from our dark and dingy long-term compost bays which are chained off from the public (don’t worry, you’re not missing much!) but a little amble around this area might just be worth your while.

Rhododendron 'Magnifica'

Rhododendron ‘Magnifica’

Of course, the name ‘Azalea Bank’ itself throws up the old question, “what is the difference between a Rhododendron and an Azalea”? Well, all Azaleas are actually Rhododendrons BUT not all Rhododendrons are Azaleas. Confused? Rhododendron is a genus (a group of plants with shared characteristics) and Azaleas are a group within that genus, rather than forming a genus of their own. To clarify a little more, an Azalea has 5 stamens (pollen-producing reproductive organ of a flower) while other Rhododendrons have 10 or more. Furthermore, Azaleas are often smaller and may be deciduous or evergreen while other Rhododendrons are all evergreen. Either way, the Rhododendrons in the Azalea Bank beds are looking blooming marvelous right now as you will see above and below…

Rhododendron 'Daviesii'

Rhododendron ‘Daviesii’

Rhododendron 'Irene Koster'

Rhododendron ‘Irene Koster’

Stunning as they are though, it wasn’t these Rhodies that prompted me to write this particular blog entry. No, there is another plant in this area that is just as pretty, just as interesting and a lot less well known. The other day I was in the gardens with a visiting friend of mine, a gardener from nearby National Trust property Scotney Castle and he asked what the yellow flowered shrubs against the wall here were. And the answer was Azara serrata. Heard of it? If you have, well done! But if you haven’t I wouldn’t be surprised.

Twin Azara serrata shrubs on the Azalea Banks

Twin Azara serrata shrubs on the Azalea Banks

The name may sound like a Harry Potter spell, but these shrubs originally from the also lesser known Flacourtiaceae family but now re-housed in the Salicaceae family, come originally from Chile, not Hogwarts! Also known as the Saw-toothed Azara, these shrubs may look fairly innocuous for most of the year, but right now they are flowering their South American socks off, covered in masses of fragrant, intricate bright yellow blooms. In fact, the sweet chocolatey scent can be smelled from some distance away.

Blue and yellow.  Good colour combo!

Blue and yellow. Good colour combo!

One of the few fully hardy South American shrubs, Azaras are in fact reasonably common in large collections of plants open to the public but virtually unheard of in private gardens. Which is a shame because after hot summers these shrubs can also have a show of round white berries to extend their season of interest. They prefer moist, fertile, humus-rich soil where possible and even grow with their roots permanently in water in their native Chile where they are called ‘Corcolén’ or ‘Aromo de Castilla’. They tolerate full sun but are equally happy in part or full shade, mimicking their woodland habitat of origin.

Our Azaras are offered good shelter from the Chartwell roadside wall

Our Azaras are offered good shelter by the Chartwell roadside wall

In 1794 the genus of Azara was named after Félix de Azara (1742 – 1821), a Spanish geographer and naturalist who did fieldwork in South America from 1781 to 1796. Azara serrata was discovered and named in the same year by Hipólito Ruiz López and José Antonio Pavón Jiménez who are jointly cited as the authors of many botanical names. Between 1779 and 1788 these Spanish botanists (together with the French botanist Joseph Dombey) visited Chile, Peru and other South American countries, discovering many new plants. Why not do some plant hunting of your own and come and discover us here at Chartwell soon…!

Jamie

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