A Blog Two Years In The Making!

The use of wallflowers in the Rose Garden borders at Chartwell

The use of wallflowers in the Rose Garden borders at Chartwell

As I sit and write this blog I know for a fact that there will at least one person who will be happy to read it, and no I’m not talking about my Mum this time! For the last couple of years, Matthew Law our Formal Garden Supervisor here at Chartwell, has been bugging me to produce a blog about the story of our wallflowers, from seed to flower. For one reason or another it never happened but now finally, here is that story!

This 'xxxxxx' wallflower comes in delicate shades of pink.

This ‘Aurora’ wallflower comes in delicate shades of pink.

'Primrose Gem' is a bright, vibrant yellow

‘Primrose Gem’ is a bright, vibrant yellow

While 'xxxxxx' is mix of smoky purples

While this imaginatively named ‘Purple’ is mix of gorgeous smoky shades

The wallflowers here at Chartwell have almost done their job as we reach the end of April. We use them as Spring bedding, along with the likes of Myosotis, Tulips, Bellis and Hyacinths, and also as cut flowers for the house before the Summer annuals start to take over. Erysimum cheiri (as Wallflowers like to called) are also still known as Cheiranthus cheiri sometimes, and are part of the Brassicaceae family that contains the likes of cabbages, broccoli and cauliflower. Native to Europe, they are also found commonly in North Africa, Asia and North America. They thrive in poor or moderately fertile soils that are preferably alkaline and in full sun.

Stage 1 - sow the seeds in trays under glass

Stage 1 – sow the seeds in trays under glass

The wallflowers we raise here are grown as biennials, meaning that they produce vegetative growth during the first year and then flower in the second year. We therefore do a lot of the work in the previous year, up to 9 months before they produce they showy flowers. You can sow the seeds of wallflowers any time from late Spring until mid Summer – June is ideal. They are quick and easy to germinate if kept moist and warm. Once the germinated seedlings produce their first sets of true leaves they can be pricked out into modules as shown below:

Modules containing various varieties of wallflowers in the Chartwell greenhouses

Modules containing various varieties of wallflowers in the Chartwell greenhouses

No this isn't the final plant, just an extreme close up of the seedling!

No this isn’t the final plant, just an extreme close up of the seedling!

The time to plant out your wallflower plants will be dictated to some extent by the weather and by how far along your plants are. Any time from late August until mid October will be fine while the soil is still still warm but has a reasonable moisture content. Always make sure that the plants have been hardened off first though, moving from greenhouse to cold frame before being placed at the mercy of the British climate.

In some years we plant out straight from the modules, as Rhiannon and myself are doing here...

In some years we plant out straight from the modules, as Rhiannon and myself are doing here…

...but perhaps a better method, if you have the time, is to pot them on into individual pots and then plant out from this stage, as Ann and I did last year.

…but perhaps a better method, if you have the time, is to pot them on into individual pots first and then plant out from this stage, as Ann and I did last year.

A little trick to create healthier, bushier plants is to pinch out the growing tips of the young plants before they enter their Winter dormancy. Allow me to demonstrate…!

Here is the young plant about to be placed in the ground

Here is the young plant about to be placed in the ground

Pinch out the tip like so...

Pinch out the tip like so…

...to leave a stockier specimen such as this

…to leave a stockier specimen such as this

The English Wallflower is so called because it is associated with ruins of old castles where it can literally grow on the walls and masonry of the old castle ruins. It was brought to the British Isles as a medicinal plant as early as the Norman Conquest and began to naturalize in England, Scotland and Ireland. Also sometimes known as Cheiry of Keiry, Bee Flower or Heart’s Ease, the former genus name Cheirianthus means ‘Handflower’, a name given because it was carried in the hand during medieval festivals. The species name of cheiri is related to the medieval common name ‘Chevisaunce’ or ‘Cherisaunce’, which means ‘Comfort’, perhaps because of its medicinal properties or because of its comforting scent and beauty.

You will find wallflowers here at Chartwell in our Herbaceous Border as Spring bedding...

You will find wallflowers here at Chartwell in our Herbaceous Border as Spring bedding…

...in the borders of Lady Churchill's Rose Garden...

…in the borders of Lady Churchill’s Rose Garden…

... and in the troughs of the Pink Terrace in the house

… and in the troughs of the Pink Terrace in the house

The Greek physician Galen believed wallflowers were useful for regulating the menstrual cycle, to relieve pain of childbirth, for liver & kidney problems and to clear cataracts. The plant does in fact contain cardiac glycosides called cheiranthosides, similar to digitalis, which can have pretty intense effects on the body. They could be potentially curative presuming of course the toxicity didn’t kill the user first! Its modern use as a herbal remedy is rare though, due to this toxic dangerousness.

Drawing of a Wallflower from 1856 (courtesy of Natural History Society of Northumbria)

Drawing of a Wallflower from 1856
(courtesy of Natural History Society of Northumbria)

The wallflower has also long been a symbol of doomed lovers. Legend has it that Elizabeth, the daughter of the Earl of March in 14th Century Scotland, dropped a wallflower from her father’s castle window as a signal to her lover that she was willing to elope with the son of King Robert III, her father’s foe. Her father, angered by her choice of lover, imprisoned her in Neidpath Castle. The prince, disguised as a minstrel, then waited near the castle wall for his beloved’s signa, when to his delight the flower fell nearby. However, Elizabeth, while attempting to climb down from the castle, fell to her death. The young prince then left Scotland, grief-stricken, roaming throughout Europe, but always keeping a sprig of wallflower in his cap.

Here is out nursery bed at the end of last year, complete with four rows of wallflowers

Here is our nursery bed at the end of last year, complete with four rows of wallflowers

And here is that bed today with most of the wallflowers removed and used around the gardens as bedding

And here is that bed today with most of the wallflowers removed and used around the gardens as bedding

We also keep some wallflowers in our raised nursery beds behind the greenhouses for use as picking for cut flowers

We also keep some wallflowers in our raised nursery beds behind the greenhouses for use as picking for cut flowers

If you pay us a visit here in Churchill’s gardens any time soon you can still catch our wallflowers before they go over and are replaced with Summer bedding. And don’t forget it will soon be time for the whole cycle to begin again so why try some for yourself?

Jamie

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2 Comments

Filed under Chartwell Life, Plants

2 responses to “A Blog Two Years In The Making!

  1. A very interesting post Jamie. I’m a fan of wallflowers and grow some every year. To save space I transplant my wallflower plugs in between my runner beans usually around June and lift and transplant them into my flower beds in early October when I take the bean sticks down. They seem to like being sheltered between the beans and produce good plants for early bedding.

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